The Stunning Trulli of Alberobello, Italy

Adventurous Kate contains affiliate links. If you make a purchase through these links, I will earn a commission at no extra cost to you. Thanks!

Alberobello Trulli

If you’re new to this site, here’s something you’ll soon learn about me: I regularly take on way more than I should, bite off way more than I can chew, and end up stressing myself out for the sake of seeing as much as possible while traveling.

The latest example? My one-day road trip through Puglia, Italy.

After a few days at the Carpino Folk Festival, I had a free day with a rental car until I had to be at Bari Airport at about 6:15 PM.

I knew that I wanted to see both of Puglia’s World Heritage Sites — Castel del Monte and the Trulli of Alberobello — and they didn’t look like they were too far from each other.

I Google Mapped it out. Carpino to Castel del Monte, two hours. Castel del Monte to Alberobello, 90 minutes. Alberobello to Bari Airport, one hour. In short, it could be done, but it would be a tight squeeze, and I wouldn’t have time to explore in depth.

Well, I did it. And I was so harried that day that I chose not to eat. I chose not to eat. In ITALY.

But it was so, so worth it. Castel del Monte was nice, but Alberobello was fantastic. It quickly became my favorite spot in Puglia.

Alberobello Trulli

I got there in the afternoon with a little over an hour to explore the trulli — not remotely enough time, at a bad time of day for light, and the trulli were absolutely crawling with tourists. Photography conditions couldn’t have been worse.

But even with those challenges, I tried to capture a bit of magic in this town. I hope you enjoy my photos.

Alberobello Trulli

The trulli (singular version: trullo) are dry mortarless stone huts built with conical tops. You see them throughout the Itria Valley in Puglia, but the greatest concentration is in Alberobello. Here’s the view from a lookout on the edge of the city center.

Alberobello Trulli

Alberobello’s trulli became a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1996. They were recognized for their mortarless construction, a building method that dates back to prehistoric times and is still in use today.

Alberobello Trulli

Could you imagine if you lived in a house like this?

Plenty of trulli have been converted into guesthouses, so you could try it for a night or two…

Alberobello Trulli

I love the contrast of the white walls and bright flowers.

Alberobello Trulli

While the trulli are all over Alberobello, there is a hilly section of town absolutely filled with trulli. This region is extremely popular with tourists, and the buildings are filled with gift shops, guesthouses, and cafes.

Alberobello Trulli

While most of the trulli are whitewashed, you’ll occasionally find some in their natural form.

Alberobello Trulli

Throughout the town, you’ll see signs for “Vista Panoramica” — panoramic view. So many of these buildings have rooftop decks that you can visit for free!

Alberobello Trulli

Then again, some of the best views are when you look up from below.

Alberobello Trulli

If you haven’t bought souvenirs in Puglia yet, Alberobello will have plenty for you to choose from. I wish I had bought some orechiette pasta to take home.

Alberobello Trulli

I love turning cloudless skies into black and white.

Frozen Espresso

I stopped in a cafe for a frozen machiatto — it was like a coffee ice cream frappe, served from a slurpee machine. PERFECT on such a hot day, and just 1.80 euros ($2.40 USD)!

Alberobello Trulli

To my surprise, my favorite part of Alberobello was actually the city itself! Away from the hordes of tourists, Alberobello is a gorgeous white city with wrought-iron balconies, brightly painted doors and shutters, and a touch of ancient Roman architecture.

Alberobello Trulli

Even in the modern city center, you still have the occasional trullo peeking out.

Alberobello Trulli

I would love to come back here for a few days to give Alberobello the time and attention it deserves. If you’re in the area, I absolutely recommend stopping by. Just make sure you have at least a few hours!

Essential Info: There are trains running to Alberobello from Bari and Taranto, but Puglia has so much to see that isn’t accessible by public transportation, and I recommend renting a car if you can. There is ample street parking in Alberobello’s city center.

The trulli are free to visit.

Must Love Festivals is brought to you by the Budget Traveller with lead partner Expedia and in association with Puglia Tourism. All opinions, as always, are my own.

Get email updates from KateNever miss a post. Unsubscribe anytime!

Subscribe to the blog: